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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
're in boston. what's your fundamental thesis? >> the american republic is born partially in a tax revolt. this is the at a party site where they threw the at a over because they didn't like the tax system. so this has been a fundamental debate and argument from the beginning of the american republic. we come back today to exactly the same sorts of issues. >> country men... reporter: well, not exactly the same. the at a parties of the past included smugglers protesting england having lowered the tax on tea, threatening their contraband business. between legend and fact, legend usually wins. the fact is as betweenaying now or paying later, americans have just about always preferred debt to taxes. debt to pay the very first army, for example. this is the spot on the cambridge common where, leng end has it, general washington first amassed his troops under a now dead elm and faced the basic question of government economics. >> how was going to pay them? how is he going to feed and clothe them? where will they get their clothes? that's a question we're still trying to answer. how do we tax ou
and a columnist with "the boston herald", and julie roginsky, former political adviser to frank lautenberg and a fox news contributor. so the washington times comes out with an editorial that says he has no mandate. they say that he is, pointed out that he's the first president since george washington to be reelected with fewer popular votes than he was in the first term and say he's got no mandate. michael, true? >> uh, it's hard to see the mandate of a campaign that seemed to be focused almost entirely on whether or not the republicans were going to break into your home and steal your feminine hygiene products. so i can't really say he ran on this plan to do x, he's going to get it. but i don't think that means he's a lame duck. he has the power of the presidency, it's a very powerful tool. he's got the media, obviously, very cooperative. so let's just say he's a limping duck might be a better answer. megyn: is -- julie, your thoughts. because the point of the editorial is they say he was limping along already and that generally in the second terms presidents don't, you know, their power
in our studio and played at boston college. i'm talking about this little girl. she sounds-like a star nfl player. she's nine years old and she's a phenom going by the name of sam gordon. sam short for samantha. >> she just took up the sport this year but realizing his daughter's undeniable talent, her dad created a video and post it had on youtube. and now she's an internet sensation. sam and her mom joins us live from salt lake city. good morning, ladies. >> good morning! >> so, sam, i understand that you tried out 172 kids in your district, you beat everybody in speed and agility and now you are the starting qb? >> yeah. >> when you see that video of yourself and everyone trying to tackle you, what are you thinking? as we look at this together, i don't know if you have a monitor there, how do you do this? how do you do it? >> i just basically run as fast as i can and try to dodge the people. >> and you are only 60 pounds. i understand that somebody else on your team is over 100 pounds. what is it like to be the -- are you the only girl on the field? >> yeah. i've gone against teams
here. >> hike in the stephen flynn from northeastern university in boston. on the issue of new normal, i wonder picking up on david's point about the price to post-9/11, is the sort of coming to grips with the hubris we could prevent bad things from happening, this huge investment in the post-secular world arabic ere we could ideally stop risk. actually coping with that is what we really need to increase and maybe just bring it very close to home. we just had this bashing mother nature in the area, priced at around $60 billion for a risk above the basic things like when you have tunnels that are only seven feet above water. it fills up the hole and you end up with 86 million gallons of oil in the tunnel and that's not hard to predict. putting safeguards in place in recovering this may be one element of this. basically the issue is that we focus too much on trying to prevent risk instead of managing it better? >> steve tried to argue for solace, which is an interesting concept. yes, back here. >> richard downey from the center for hemispheric u.s. david, you mentioned in the election t
the presidential race. the staff certainly said one thing, but i live in boston, near romney headquarters, so my cut was sensing a lot confidence coming out of that building. unlike mitt romney i had a concession speech prepared, for this event, as we thought through what this conversation would be like depending on either scenario, but i have a quick reflection on election night. the first was remembering exactly what it felt like in 2004 where you had a dozen constitutional amendments passed across the country, you haven't karl rove celebrated as the architect who had built a new republican electoral majority that would have traction for a decade or two, and you had a president reelected with the use of the wedge issue, a gay and lesbian, belgae bt families across the country, a dark moment, the fetal position for the lgbt movement, at what i sensed this year was how proud i was about our resilience. we pick ourselves up. we decided to fight in states. we decided to start talking to republicans. we decided to ban more from our great democratic friends. some people predicted, and it was a sense
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)